Tuesday, June 21, 2016

My Review for "A Court of Mist and Fury"

A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #2)A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Painted in shades of the classic myth, Hades and Persephone, A Court of Mist and Fury shines high above its predecessor, A Court of Thorns and Roses.
Now that Feyre is immortal, she is left to deal with the bloody consequences of what happened Under the Mountain. Tamlin, the High Lord of the Spring Court and her lover has his own demons to battle. Between planning for their wedding and the new High Priestess in residence propping and puffing up Feyre like a puppet, both Tamlin and Feyre tuck their troubles under the rug.
This is one of the things I love best about Sarah J. Maas's stories. Rather than settling for a happily ever after, Maas takes you beyond the ending you expected and makes her characters face consequences for their actions. She made me fall in love with Tamlin and Lucien in the first book as they introduce Feyre to the world of Prythian. And then during Under the Mountain, she had me aching for the High Lord of the Night Court, Rhysand. Something about the way Rhys treated Feyre Under the Mountain made me love him maybe a bit more.
In A Court of Mist and Fury, Rhys makes his reappearance with a classic dramatic entrance, subsequently pissing everyone off and then doing his best to make Feyre and us the readers fall in love with him. The Night Court was just as terrifying and dreamlike as I could have imagined and the sort of place I would happily live (partially thanks to the plumbing). As Feyre meets Rhys's inner court, and the High Lord's many masks begin to unfold, she slowly begins to piece herself back together. As they travel to other fae courts and realms, both achingly gorgeous and frightening, Feyre slowly becomes the immortal Fae she chooses to be.
An adult fairy tale about the darkest and brightest shades of the soul and the loves that break and remake us, A Court of Mist and Fury is addictive in its prose and ephemeral as stardust.

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